16 June 2017
In "a major technical accomplishment" on quantum communication, Chinese scientists on 15 June reported a successful transmission of "entangled" photon pairs from space to the Earth in efforts to prove that a physical phenomenon once described by Albert Einstein as "spooky" exists at a large distance. A team of Chinese scientists have realized the satellite-based distribution of entangled photon pairs over 1,200 kilometers. The photon pairs were demonstrated to be still entangled after travelling long distances. This satellite-based technology opens up bright prospects for both practical quantum communications and fundamental quantum optics experiments at distances previously inaccessible on the ground, said Pan Jianwei, an academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The achievement was made based on the world' s first quantum satellite, Quantum Experiments at Space Scale (QUESS), also dubbed Micius, launched by China on 16 August 2016.
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Factbox: Quantum communication and its application
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15 June 2017
China launched two remote-sensing micro-nano satellites on a Long March-4B rocket from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China's Gobi Desert on 15 June. The OVS-1A and the OVS-1B, the first two satellites of Zhuhai-I remote-sensing micro-nano satellite constellation, are expected to improve the monitoring of geographical, environmental, and geological changes across the country, according to Beijing Institute of Space Science and Technology Information.
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16 June 2017
China will launch a further four space probes before 2021 as part of the efforts to develop space science, according to the State Administration of Science, Technology and Industry for National Defence on 16 June. The China-Italy Electromagnetic Monitoring Experiment Satellite will be launched this August to study phenomena related to earthquakes from space.
The China-France Oceanography Satellite is expected to be launched in 2018. It will study ocean-surface wind and waves to improve forecasts for ocean waves and strengthen disaster prevention and mitigation. An astronomical satellite jointly developed by China and France will be launched in 2021 to study gamma rays and provide data for research in dark energy and the evolution of the universe. China plans to launch the country's first Mars probe in 2020, which is expected to orbit the red planet, land and deploy a rover in just one mission.
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15 June 2017
China's Tianzhou-1 and Tiangong-2 space lab completed their second in-orbit refueling at 6:28 p.m. 15 June.
The second refueling, lasting about two days, further tested the country's refueling technology and cemented technical results from the first refueling.
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15 June 2017
China launched its first X-ray space telescope to observe black holes, pulsars and gamma-ray bursts, via a Long March-4B rocket from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China's Gobi Desert at 11 a.m. 15 June. The 2.5-tonne Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT), dubbed Insight, was sent into an orbit of 550 kilometers above the earth to help scientists better understand the evolution of black holes, and the strong magnetic fields and the interiors of pulsars.
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for more details look at NASA Spaceflight.com
China launches X-ray telescope via Long March 4B
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15 June 2017
In the next three years, China will launch its first commercial low-orbit satellites system, designed to collect real-time data for industries including the heavy machinery and logistics sectors, according to the company behind it. Beijing-based private company Commsat Technology Development Co Ltd said that from 2018 to 2020, it will position 60 satellites at six different orbits, about 600 kilometers above the Earth.
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