20 May 2018
On 21 May, China plans to launch a satellite with a vital but unglamorous mission. From a vantage point beyond the moon, Queqiao, as the satellite is called, will relay data from Chang'e 4, a lander and rover that is supposed to touch down on the lunar far side before the end of the year. But a Dutch-made radio receiver aboard Queqiao will attempt something more visionary. In the quiet lunar environment, it will listen to the cosmos at low frequencies that carry clues to the time a few hundred million years after the big bang, when clouds of hydrogen gas were spawning the universe's first stars.
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20 May 2018
China's Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST) will have with a new receiver installed to boost its efficiency in surveying the sky. The 19-beam L-band receiver, first of its kind worldwide, is expected to be put into use in early June and it will increase FAST's survey speed by five to six times, according to Friday's Science and Technology Daily. The receiver was jointly developed by scientists from China and Australia. It weighs 1.2 tonnes and cost over 20 million yuan (about 3.14 million U.S. dollars).
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17 May 2018
The Russian space research institute IMBP - Institute of Biomedical Problems - and other Russian space organisations are ready to assist China and its partners in creating an international rehabilitation center for cosmonauts, as well as other infrastructure needed for developing space medicine and biology, a spokesman for the Institute of Biomedical Problems of the Russian Academy of Science told Russian media.
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16 May 2018
China surprised the global community of science and technology with its recent success in quantum telecommunication. The next surprise could become the wave of Chinese commercial space activities aiming not only on the national market but targeting international customers in the areas of launch services, remote sensing satellites, communication satellites, and satellite platforms. GoTaikonauts! has reviewed the historical beginnings and the development of China’s commercial space activities until today. This comprehensive report can be read in issue no 22 (for release next month) In the current issue, issue no 21, can be found the first part of an report on the status quo in the Chinese commercial space industry – giving an overview on launcher activities.

17 May 2018
In the morning of the 17 May at 7:33 a.m. Beijing Time, Chinese commercial space company OneSpace launched its "Chongqing Liangjiang Star" rocket from a launch center in northwest China. OneSpace is a Beijing-based private company with a manufacturing base in southwest China's Chongqing Municipality. The nine-meter-long, 7,200-kg rocket has a maximum altitude of 38.742 kilometers and a top speed of more than 5.7 times the speed of sound, according to Shu Chang, founder and CEO of OneSpace.
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13 May 2018
Launching rockets and satellites has long been the preserve of China's state-owned aerospace companies, but private space firms are now popping up hoping to find gold in the space dust. A report by Beijing-based investment institution FutureAerospace says more than 60 private Chinese firms have entered the commercial space industry over the past three years, focusing on the production and launch of satellites and rockets.
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For a comprehensive overview on the current state of commercial space activities in China, read the latest issue of the GoTaikonauts! newsletter, issue 21. The second part of the overview along with the full historical review of China's commercial space activities will be published in the next issue, no 22.