30 May 2020
On 30 May at 04:13 BJT (29 May, 20:13 UTC), the Long March 11 launched from Xichang Satellite Launch Centre two technology test satellites "G" and "H". The satellites successfully entered the planned orbit. The new technology test satellites G and H are mainly used for in-orbit testing of new Earth observation technology. The mission is the 332th flight of the Long March series, and it was also the first time that the long Chang Zheng 11 was launched from Xichang.
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footage from the launch and the mission control and operations centre - or here 

29 May 2020
Chinese engineers opened the re-entry module of the prototype of China's new-generation manned spacecraft that returned to Earth earlier this month, distributing items inside it to their owners. Nearly 100 items, ranging from test equipment and experimental devices to cultural products, were sent into space inside the module. Dozens of items carried by the re-entry module were delivered to related parties at a ceremony on 29 May afternoon at the China Academy of Space Technology in Beijing - nationals flags of Pakistan and Argentina were given to diplomats from the two countries; a 3D printer was handed over to the Chinese Academy of Sciences; plant seeds were returned to researchers from several provinces; and scientific experimental equipment were delivered to their developers.
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28 May 2020
Scientists will be included among China's third batch of astronauts as the country opens up its space program to a wider range of talents, Zhou Jianping, Chief Designer of China's manned space programme, said in Beijing on 26 May. The selection will be completed around July, added Zhou in an online interview on the sidelines of the third session of the 13th National Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative
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27 May 2020
Members of a Chinese surveying team reached the summit of Mt. Qomolangma in the morning of 27 May 2020 via the northern Tibetan route, a crucial step in the country's mission to remeasure the height of the world's highest peak. After reaching the summit, the expedition team erected a survey marker and installed a GNSS antenna.
The surveyors used a global navigation satellite system receiver, a gravimeter, snow-depth radar and a meteorological measuring instrument to determine the height of Qomolangma. Innovations applied in the latest survey include the application of the BeiDou-3 Navigation Satellite System, domestic surveying equipment, the airborne gravimeter and 3D interactive virtual reality. It will probably take two to three months for scientists to calculate and release the exact height of Mount Qomolangma.
According to the Joint Statement Between the China and Nepal published on 13 October 2019, both countries will jointly announce the height and conduct scientific researches. The Nepali government's efforts to measure the height of Mt. Qomolangma come amid speculations from some scientists that the world's tallest mountain has shrunk after the devastating earthquake in 2015 in Nepal.
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RELATED
Chinese team completes measurement work on Mount Qomolangma using homegrown technology


28 May 2020
CALT's engineers are preparing for the debut mission of the Long March 8. The Long March 8 will improve China's launch capability for sun-synchronous orbit and will also boost the nation's commercial space industry, said Bao Weimin, Director of Science and Technology at CASC and an Academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The rocket will mainly satisfy commercial launch needs in domestic and international markets, he said, predicting that it will likely conduct 10 to 20 launches annually after it goes into service.
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27 May 2020
China Satellite Communications Company Limited (ChinaSat) is the leading satellite operator in China, with a fleet of more than 10 satellites in geostationary orbit. The company has for decades broadcast central and provincial government TV channels, as well as some foreign channels, across China and broader APAC on a fleet of Chinese-built satellites. This business model is a well-established one... ChinaSat also conducted an IPO last year, floating around 9% of the company’s share capital on the Shanghai Stock Exchange. This was a big deal in China, with ChinaSat being one of the rare examples of a well-established space company offering shares for public trading. In the ~11 months since, though, we have found that apparently it was a much, much bigger deal than originally expected. How so, you ask? Blaine Curcio of Orbital Gateway Consulting is providing the answer in a blog post on westeastspace.com.
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